Friends of the Library Book Club

The Friends of The Princeton Public Library Book Club is reading The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck. Join them on Thursday, November 11th at 4:00pm to be a part of the discussion. The full review from BookReporter.com is as follows: The simple raw imagery of The Good Earth won Pearl S. Buck the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1932. Its poignant portrayal of a poor farmer’s life and his bond with the land is as relevant to our own ancestral roots as it is to rural China. Wang Lung, the central figure around which the entire narrative revolves, is a man of many complexities depicted by his relationships with his wife, his father, his children and his village. His land is precious, its value equating to his own self-worth. Although steeped in the ancient traditions, he reflects certain enlightened thinking at times that may be more for the author’s emphasis of injustices than a true depiction of the average Chinese peasant in the early 1900s.

Wang Lung’s story begins as a young man seeking a wife to cook, clean and bear his children. O-lan, a slave’s slave from a wealthy household, comes to live and share his life in the subservient fashion that traditions dictate. Initially their marriage brings satisfaction to both, although for vastly different reasons. Wang Lung has a sense of fulfillment in having such a wise and competent woman to raise his children and maintain his home. And even though women are still considered “slaves” by their men, O-lan has found a better life than she’s ever known; she is well-cared for and Wang Lung is kind. Together they bring five children into the world and work their thriving farm…

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.